1930s Japanese Photography 日本の写真 1930年代 展 図録

Published by Kanagawa Prefectural Museum of Modern Art, Kanagawa, 1988, unpaginated (colour & b/w ill.), 25 × 24.3 cm, Japanese

Price: €65

A pictorial record of the exhibition Japanese Photography 1930s, Kanagawa Prefectural Museum of Modern Art, 1988, which collects photographs from the emerging photography of the era. Approximately 340 illustrations of the work of photographers such as Kiyoshi Koishi, Shoji Ueda, Ei-Q, Koshiro Onchi, Nakaji Yasui, Iwata Nakayama, Shinzō Fukuhara, Kineo Kuwabara, Terushichi Hirai amongst others.

#1988 #abstractphotography #ei-q #iwatanakayama #japanesephotography #kineokuwabara #kiyoshikoishi #koshiroonchi #nakajiyasui #photography #shinzofukuhara #shojiueda #terushichihirai
Retrospective / ’96-’97 Iwata Nakayama

Published by Ashiya City Museum of Art and History, Ashiya & Shoto Museum of Art, Tokyo, 1996, 192 pages ( b/w ill.), 21 × 27.5 cm, Japanese

Price: €75

Iwata Nakayama (1895-1949) is regarded as a one of the most important contributors to the Shinko Shashin movement. After graduating from the Tokyo School of Fine Arts in 1918, he received a scholarship from the Japanese government and went to California before settling in New York. At the same time Nakayama was attracted to avant-garde movements and moved in bohemian circles where he met Shimizu Toshi. Shimizu encouraged him to move to Paris in 1926 where he met Man Ray, Fujita Tsuguji, and Enrico Prompolini. These encounters left a deep impression on him and when he returned to Japan in 1927 he energetically set about forming his own vision of ‘pure art photography’. In 1929 he settled in Ashiya (nr. Kobe) and in the following year founded the Ashiya Camera Club with Hanaya Kambei, Korai Seiji, and others. This club became the main driving force of New Photography in Japan. Together with Kimura and Nojima he founded Koga magazine in 1932 that was the most important forum for artistic photography at the time.

#1996 #abstractphotography #iwatanakayama #japaneseavant-garde #japanesephotography #photography
Japan’s Modern Divide: The Photographs of Hiroshi Hamaya and Kansuke Yamamoto

Published by Getty Publications, Los Angeles, 2013, 224 pages (colour & b/w ill.), 24.1 × 28 cm, English

Price: €28

Produced on the occasion of Japan’s Modern Divide: The Photographs of Hiroshi Hamaya and Kansuke Yamamoto at the Getty Center, Los Angeles, March 26 – August 25, 2013.

Throughout his career Hiroshi Hamaya pursued objective documentation, while Kansuke Yamamoto favoured avant-garde forms of expression. These photographers embody two sides of modern Japanese life: the traditional and the forward looking, the rural and the urban, the Eastern and the Western.

Both artists grew up during the brief Taishō era (1912–1926), a period of industrialization and experimentation that ushered in the modern Shōwa era (1926–1989). It was during this time, between the international Depression and World War II, that Hamaya began to document regional traditions and social issues, primarily on the country’s rugged “back coast” along the Sea of Japan. In contrast, Yamamoto found inspiration in Surrealist art from Europe and produced innovative, socially conscious photographs, poems, and other works that advanced the avant-garde movement in Japan.

#2013 #hiroshihamaya #japaneseavant-garde #japanesephotography #kansukeyamamoto #photography
ABSTRACT PAINTINGS IN JAPAN 1910-1945

Published by The Japan Association of Art Museums, Tokyo, 1992, 225 pages (colour & b/w ill.), 25 × 24 cm, Japanese

Price: €35 (Out of stock)

Comprehensive survey of early Japanese abstract painting (and photography)
Including Koshiro Onchi, Iwata Nakayama, Saburo Hasegawa, Kiyoshi Koishi, Ryuichi Amano, Ei-Q and many more.

#1992 #abstractphotography #ei-q #iwatanakayama #japaneseavant-garde #japanesephotography #kiyoshikoishi #koshiroonchi #ryuichiamano #saburohasegawa
Ei-Q

Published by Fuji Television Gallery, 1974, 48 pages (b/w ill.), 12.5 × 24 cm, Japanese

Price: €18 (Out of stock)

Ei-Q, April 28, 1911 – March 10, 1960, was a Japanese artist who worked in a variety of media, including photography and engraving.

He was influenced by the Surrealist aesthetic and also published essays promoting photography as an art form independent of painting. This did not imply a rejection of painting, and he worked toward what in 1935 he termed photo-dessins, a fusion of photograms and paintings.

#1974 #abstractphotography #ei-q #japaneseavant-garde #japanesephotography
Traces of Light in Modernism: Koshiro Onchi, Osamu Shiihara and Ei-Q

Published by The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, 1997, 40 pages (b/w ill.), 21 × 29.7 cm, Japanese / English

Price: €40 (Out of stock)

Various artistic trends originating in Europe after World War 1, such as Russian Constructivism, the Bauhaus in Germany and Surrealism in France, left a strong impression on Japanese art and photography in the Taisho and the early Showa periods. In photography in particular, the Western influence brought a new movement called Shinko Shashin (New Photography) in the early Showa period. This exhibition was an attempt at reexamining the viual expression in the period from the perspective of the photographic work of artist from fields other than photography, focusing on the work of Koshiro Onchi, Osamu Shiihara and Ei-Q

#1997 #abstractphotography #ei-q #japaneseavant-garde #japanesephotography #koshiroonchi #osamushiihara #photography